5 Holiday Pet Safety Tips

Holiday Pet Safety Tips in Post Falls, ID

America’s favorite winter holidays are just weeks away! We know you’re busy shopping, decorating, and party planning, so we wanted to remind you of a few things to keep your pet safe this holiday season. Consider the following five pet holiday safety tips from Kootenai Animal Hospital in Post Falls. We hope you both have a holly jolly season and a wonderful new year with your pet!

Tinsel and Garland Safety

As you decorate your tree, keep in mind that there are certain decorations like tinsel and garland that can be dangerous to your pet if ingested. This is especially important to remember if you have a cat, since cats are known to be drawn to shiny, stringy items. If ingested, these decorations can pose an obstruction hazard, which may require surgery to correct. So either avoid buying these decorations altogether or keep them in an area where your pet can’t access them.

Keep Pets Away from Christmas Tree Water

Many pet owners opt for real Christmas trees, unaware of the potential dangers that they can create for their pets. To a thirsty pet, a bucket of Christmas tree water is just another harmless bowl of water to slurp up. But if that water contains toxic agents like preservatives and pesticides (often used to keep the tree fresh), drinking it can be very dangerous to a pet. If you have a real Christmas tree in your home, use a tree skirt to cover the water to eliminate any temptation for your pet to drink it. Also make sure to leave plenty of water in your pet’s bowl to keep them hydrated.

Dangers of Holiday Plants

Mistletoe, holly, and lilies are just a few of the seasonal plants that are toxic to pets. If ingested, these plants can result in vomiting, diarrhea, and even kidney failure if treatment isn’t sought. So either keep these plants out of your pet’s reach or choose artificial plants instead. If ever you suspect that your pet has eaten a toxic plant or any other toxic substance, call Kootenai Animal Hospital at (208) 77-6000 or your local emergency veterinary hospital for an after-hours emergency.

Keep Electrical Cords Out of Your Pet’s Reach

If you have a curious pet, don’t string the bottom of your Christmas tree with lights, since many pets are known to paw at twinkling lights or chew on them. Chewing on electrical cords and lights can cause electric shocks and even mouth burns. Keep those Christmas lights out of your curious pet’s reach, or opt for a fiber optic tree instead.

Dangers of Fatty Foods and Table Scraps for Pets

We know you might be tempted to share your holiday meals with your pet, but before you do, keep in mind that there are certain foods that can be dangerous for them. Fatty foods like bacon, sausage, and poultry skin are on the list. These and other fatty foods can cause pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas. They can also contribute to weight gain and obesity. So as a rule of thumb, avoid feeding your pet any fatty table scraps from your holiday feasts.

5 Holiday Pet Safety Tips

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America’s favorite winter holidays are just weeks away! We know you’re busy shopping, decorating, and party planning, so we wanted to remind you of a few things to keep your pet safe this holiday season. Consider the following five pet holiday safety tips from Kootenai Animal Hospital in Post Falls. We hope you both have a holly jolly season and a wonderful new year with your pet!

Tinsel and Garland Safety

As you decorate your tree, keep in mind that there are certain decorations like tinsel and garland that can be dangerous to your pet if ingested. This is especially important to remember if you have a cat, since cats are known to be drawn to shiny, stringy items. If ingested, these decorations can pose an obstruction hazard, which may require surgery to correct. So either avoid buying these decorations altogether or keep them in an area where your pet can’t access them.

Keep Pets Away from Christmas Tree Water

Many pet owners opt for real Christmas trees, unaware of the potential dangers that they can create for their pets. To a thirsty pet, a bucket of Christmas tree water is just another harmless bowl of water to slurp up. But if that water contains toxic agents like preservatives and pesticides (often used to keep the tree fresh), drinking it can be very dangerous to a pet. If you have a real Christmas tree in your home, use a tree skirt to cover the water to eliminate any temptation for your pet to drink it. Also make sure to leave plenty of water in your pet’s bowl to keep them hydrated.

Dangers of Holiday Plants

Mistletoe, holly, and lilies are just a few of the seasonal plants that are toxic to pets. If ingested, these plants can result in vomiting, diarrhea, and even kidney failure if treatment isn’t sought. So either keep these plants out of your pet’s reach or choose artificial plants instead. If ever you suspect that your pet has eaten a toxic plant or any other toxic substance, call Kootenai Animal Hospital at (208) 77-6000 or your local emergency veterinary hospital for an after-hours emergency.

Keep Electrical Cords Out of Your Pet’s Reach

If you have a curious pet, don’t string the bottom of your Christmas tree with lights, since many pets are known to paw at twinkling lights or chew on them. Chewing on electrical cords and lights can cause electric shocks and even mouth burns. Keep those Christmas lights out of your curious pet’s reach, or opt for a fiber optic tree instead.

Dangers of Fatty Foods and Table Scraps for Pets

We know you might be tempted to share your holiday meals with your pet, but before you do, keep in mind that there are certain foods that can be dangerous for them. Fatty foods like bacon, sausage, and poultry skin are on the list. These and other fatty foods can cause pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas. They can also contribute to weight gain and obesity. So as a rule of thumb, avoid feeding your pet any fatty table scraps from your holiday feasts.

Pet Safety For Halloween

Halloween Pet Safety Tips in Holmdel, NJ

The Halloween season may be fun for us but there are many seasonal dangers that can affect our furry friends. The veterinary team at Kootenai Animal Hospital is committed to keeping our patients safe and healthy during the Halloween season and we’re here to be your partner in your pet’s care. Explore some of the most common Halloween season dangers detailed below, and as always, contact us immediately to speak to Dr. Rogers and the team if you have any questions or if you suspect that your pet is in an emergency situation. Prompt treatment is often the best means of getting your pet back on the road to good health as quickly as possible.

Jack-o-Lanterns, Candles, and Fires, Oh My!

Jack-o-Lanterns are some of the most popular Halloween decorations, and while they can be cute, they can also be quite dangerous! Anytime lit candles are within your pet’s reach, precautions should be taken to ensure that your pet stays safe. We recommend using battery operated candles in your carved pumpkins so that if they are knocked over by your pet, the danger of hot wax and burns is eliminated.

Bonfires can also be dangerous for our pets, especially when they spark. Our pets may not realize how dangerous a fire is and can venture too close, so it’s important that you keep an eye on your pet and make sure they are always supervised around fires.

Sweet Poison: The Danger of Halloween Candy For Pets

Candy, especially sugar-free candy and chocolate, are extremely dangerous for our pets if consumed! These treats contain ingredients that can be toxic for them. If your pet eats any candy, please contact our team right away so we can assess the situation and determine if your pet needs immediately treatment.

Halloween Costume Dangers for Pets

This may not seem like a real danger, but trust us, Halloween costumes have been known to cause many hazards for our pets! If you’re dressing your pet up for Halloween, t’s so important to ensure that your pet is comfortable in their costume and isn’t struggling to get out of it, which can cause them to injure themselves. Never keep your pet in costume if they are unattended and always keep an eye on the situation, watching for signs of discomfort or irritation.